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of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
relations committee, i think a great deal of what good foreign policy about is building personal relationships and building personal relationships with leaders around the world. and the one thing that i've really observed, senator kerry, of you is that you have done that. and we have had so many of these private meetings across over there in the capitol and in the small foreign relations room and i could just feel with meeting with all these leaders, the tremendous respect that they have for you and the ability you are going to have to build on that to make an excellent secretary of state. so i'm very excited about this opportunity for you and i want, in my first question here i wanted to focus on mexico and central america. during the last decade, relations between the united states and mexico have strengthened as a result of our shared security goals relating to the initiative. and one of the pillars of that initiative includes judicial reform and you know this very well. however, the federal government and many of the mexican states have yet to pass legislation which would cha
croft was pointing out in the interview, saying they had no major foreign policy accomplishments, major ones, that is, that they could hold high was his question in the first four years. will that change for kerry? will that be different in this second term with hillary clinton gone? >> i think there are some openings for the obama administration that weren't there in the first four years. you know, we're out of iraq. we're going to be out of afghanistan, our troops out of afghanistan at the end of next year. i think there are going to be some foreign policy challenges with iran and syria and libya and who knows where. and maybe a little bit more of an opening for foreign policy. we also know that presidents in their second term, they tend to turn to foreign policy in those final two years when it is so hard to get things through congress. so i would say, you know, and he's got a secretary of state who's very experienced in john kerry and who also has a relationship with barack obama. >> is there anything he can't do now that secretary clinton will be -- again, friday is her last day. w
? the country's belligerent stance is one more issue on the president's full foreign policy plate, and it's going to be a concern for john kerry if he's confirmed secretary of state as he's very likely to be, increasingly likely, as a matter of fact. he got a very warm welcome from both sides of the hearing at his confirmation hearings in the senate today. >> the friendship has endured i believe it is based in myture respect. some observers have attributed that respect to the fact that when we were much younger nicer and better looking men than we are now senator kerry and i spent some time at the navy's behest in a certain southeast asian country in less pleasant circumstances than we're accustomed to in the united states senate. >> john is the right choice. and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> it's john john mccain so nice. much better reception than clinton herds got yesterday during the testimony of the bengahzi attacks. but it wasn't all warm and fuzzy. senator rob johnson who went after hillary clinton tried to get kerry to contradict hillary clinton's testimony. but he did not ta
, very close to the president, isn't he? >> reporter: that's right. in a foreign policy capacity he has been. this is someone who's been very much inside president obama's close circle. he's advised him during the troop withdrawal in iraq, the current one going on in afghanistan and he's in a photo that's now become famous. he was in the situation room during the raid on osama bin laden's house. you'll see him sitting next to secretary of state hillary clinton. it goes back mump further than that. he has been here at the white house since the beginning of president obama's first term. in fact, he helped him as he was coming in to the white house and their time together goes all the way back to when president obama was a senator-elect, when he was coming from being a state legislator in illinois to the senate. so all the way back to his time where he first came to washington. he also was a foreign policy adviser, ashleigh, to the former senate majority leader tom daschle. so he has quite a long credential when it comes to foreign policy, but also he'll obviously be dealing as well with d
attack. joining us now, danielle pletka, vice president foreign policy and defense studies, defense policy studies, i should say, at the american enterprise institute. danielle, thanks for being with us. you wrote a column this week in which your first words were it's hard to like john kerry? [laughter] >> well, i worked for ten years up at the senate foreign relations committee when senator kerry wasn't the chairman, he was one of the other members of the committee. he's just not that popular on capitol hill. he hasn't worked well with other members. that was one of the problems he had when he ran for president. he's perceived as being stand offish, as being uninterested in their issues and in being kind of doctrinaire on policy. jon: but bob corker, the new mexico senator -- we're going to be talking to him next hour -- had glowing words for senator kerry in the hearing this morning. >> every senator walks into a hearing with another senator who's been nominated for something thinking there but for the grace of god go i. it's a collegial institution, but the collegiality is about
. the important foreign-policy issue of benghazi. it was something we were talking about a month ago, but it faded into the background. everybody will be watching tomorrow. it is a big deal to have the secretary of state come in. everyone wants to hear what she has to say about this. she becomes less of a focus because she's leaving, some say. but it will be really important hearing. the group publicans' want a special committee formed to investigate the because the issue, but they did not get that. all we will crb hearings where we get a picture of it from people who were heading the operation. so her parents will be very big tomorrow. guest: more broadly, on national security, we will enter the beginning of confirmation hearings for john kerry as secretary of state, chuck hagel as secretary of defense. consideration of our military strategy, our military spending, how we project american power as we complete a winding down of the war in afghanistan. it is really going to be the end of a post-9/11 period in national security policy, with the policy going for it from there still unsettled. guest:
's foreign policy, aid related or diplomacy in our presence throughout the world. you know, if you look back to, say, congress can 20, 25 years ago, it was essentially made up of people who had a relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of u.s. global engagement, the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan and america's presence. and the relationship also, i mean, and the lessons and the threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesmen, henry jackson and others, on a bipartisan politics at the water's edge, america's presence b and engagement around the world. two superpowers of the um real la that kind of -- umbrella was kind of held over the world and stifled the kind of regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment, i think, and support for the commitment for the u.s. to be a global, globally engaged, the superpower. um, it was the possibility of a five-alarm fire, and everybody's in to try to keep th
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
domestically and foreign policy although he has said iran is the number one issue that he has to deal with as he relates to security. as for united states been frosty lately between prime minister netanyahu and president obama. this could cut either way. either all of a sudden he could view himself as a weak prime minister. become more conciliatory. offer to go into peace talks with the palestinians as president obama has asked for. this could push him harder to the right, meaning he becomes more hard line and take as much stuffer stance against president obama in the coming months. shep? >> shepard: leland vittert as they dissemmable the campaign headquarters and start the business of the country tomorrow. thank you. britain's prince harry kill taliban firefighters. interviews and reaction to naked pictures from vegas, baby, vegas. ♪ [ male announcer ] something powerful is coming. ♪ see it on february 3rd. ♪ nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex g
state department and to work with me in tackling this ambitious foreign policy agenda. >> what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're actually considering you as a possibility for secretary of state? >> she didn't believe it. >> reporter: he is one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day after hearing it from two reporters. and i'm pretty sure her reply was something along the lines of, not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant, why not just say no? >> i think she did or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton, secretary of state designate -- >> clinton was quickly confirmed. but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> so was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been surprised. >> su
donough. he's seen as a top foreign policy adviser to the president. he would be obama's fifth chief of staff. >>> all right. feeling a little drowsy this morning? you're in good company. new research from harvard medical school finds about one-third of all workers just aren't getting enough sleep to work at peak efficiency. and that's costing u.s. companies more than $63 billion a year in lost productivity. richard lui is here with a drill down on third pun of the day, an eye-opening report. >> it is. and this is a sign of the times. >> i'm sorry. it's friday. >> not the puns but this. sleep pods are not a common sight at most businesses. with the cost of sleepy workers rising, the metro nap energy pod is becoming more popular. and devices like that. google has $13,000 lounges like that on its campus. now others are investing in sleep programs according to "the wall street journal." shuteye shortage has hit our capital, too. vice president biden had a 30-second blink during an obama speech while tim geithner fought the long blink with rapid fire right next to him. secretary of state hillary
and then we talk about our wonderful foreign policy. >> gretchen: she did talk about the fact that she did believe that the world was a more dangerous place now than ever before. but that was in the second part of the interview. the first part of the interview before the commercial break was talking about the relationship between president obama and mrs. clinton. i want now listen to this and then get your reaction. >> i just want to have a chance of to publicly say thank you 'cause i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we have. >> after i ended my campaign, i immediately did everything i could to help the president get elected because despite our hard fought primary, we had such agreement on what needed to be done for our country. >> it made for tough debates. >> it did. >> we could never figure out what we differed on. >> yeah. we worked at that pretty hard. >> i consider hillary a strong friend. >> very warm, close. i think there is a sense of understanding that sometimes doesn't even take words because we have similar views. we have similar experiences t
of the topics include foreign policy, and control, and women's abortion rights. it begins at noon eastern with cdc's "meet the press." at 1:00 p.m., but the ranking member of the foreign relations committees, senator john mccain, of addendas -- bob menendez. at two o'clock p.m. it is "fox news sunday." and assistant majority leader -- the state of the union follows at 3:00 p.m.. also a retired general and former cia director. administered by dianne feinstein and gov. bob macdonald of virginia and gov. scott walker of wisconsin. at 4:00, bob schieffer talks with senator dianne feinstein. the sending network talk shows this afternoon on c-span radio are brought to you by a public service by the network and c- span. the re-air begins -- you can listen to them all on c- span radio. nationwide on at some satellite radio channel 119. you can listen to on your smart phone or go online to c- spanradio.org >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> the best training -- you learn how to develop sources, you learn how the use intelligence information, you learn how to leverage relationships. t
that is extremely well. that line. it '02 not only a foreign policy figure but a politician. what is the effective counter to that? one, i think we have to acknowledge we have a lot of nation building to do here at home. and that needs to be the priority. and that reality i think is going effect the kind of resources we are going have available to do the kind of global engagement global diplomacy that we have seen in the past. and i think we're going -- we are severely resource constrainted and politically constrained and we have to prioritize and make the case for whatever expenditure go out relative to military presence and spending more state and diplomacy in foreign aid spending. so that is the reality that we have to deal with, we have to, i believe, we will be forced to have to make hard choices. in that regard. secondly, i would simply say as i say to virtually every interest group that comes in to my office saying you know -- here is the line. we know that resources are tight, we know we have to give it back, but our program is different than everybody else's. and that's universal. and rat
a foreign policy that can doing development as well as diplomacy that can reach out to women's groups, to youth, to entrepreneurs, to religious groups. that's the softer side. but it's also the smart side. and it's not john kerry's natural bailiwick, but it's very important that he build on that legacy. >> i take it that state department will be much different under kerry. and marie slaughter, thank you very much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> a woman accused of stabbing her boyfriend more than 20 times is claiming self-defense. it's one of the hottest trials going on right now. we'll dig deeper on the jodi arias trial with hln's jane velez-mitchell just ahead. >> one day when he drove home from a little league game, i saw a homeless man with a cardboard sign that said "need a meal." so i told my mom i wanted to do something. >> will larsy is a 9-year-old child. i hesitate to call him child. i think he's in a category of his own. as a 7-year-old, he decided he was going to take on this issue of hunger. >> welcome to frogs. >> my group is called frogs and it means friends reaching o
where were the tough questions about global hot spots and our foreign policies. let's talk about it with jim pinkerton a contributing editor and writer for the american conservative magazine. alan colmes host of the alan colmes radio show and author of thank the liberals for saving america. welcome to both of you. steve croft said it in the intro he said we barely had enough time to scratch the surface of their complicated relationship. jim, assess what scratching they did? >> no scratching whatsoever, that is for sure. every journalist has to make a choice. if you want the interview you sometimes have to take the terms that the interviewee wants whether the termser explicit or implicit. when oprah winfrey be began to interview lance armstrong. was tough question, tough question, tough question, a tough interview at least the first half. steve croft has set himself up for puff tee interviews with the obama administration. it was quite striking. ron forneau of the national journal said the president and mrs. clinton were like an old married couple, happily sitting there and happil
fiscal cliff discussion, the economy is going to get zooming, we're going to -- foreign policy. >> it could end up being in foreign policy, drawing down troops, transitioning to this new kind of fighting force with the drone warfare, sort of in keeping with what we're alluding to eisenhower had. >> i think we're going to watch too very different but equally fascinating dramas play out. inside washington, the republicans still have the votes to stop the president on many things. they still control the house. they still have operational gridlock in the senate, if you will, even though democrats picked up. inside washington, the president has a challenge. but if you look at this, groundbreaking on gaye rights, back to climate change, gun control, immigration. and who that appeals to, as jack just said. they have made a doubling down of what they did in the campaign. they believe they have the coalition of the future -- young people, latinos, african-americans, and they believe the republican coalition is aging, in decline, and fractured. so they think politically they have the jui
is the sole witness today at back-to-back hearings before the senate and house foreign policy committee. here live coverage of the senate hearing at 9:00 a.m. eastern and a house hearing at 2:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span radio or watched the hearings on c-span 3. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> i said it before and i will say it again -- the best training you can get to become a really good police officer and understand what it's all about is walk but -- you learn how to develop sources, you learn how to use intelligence information. you learn how to leverage relationships. that is the key. people in a community trust you, they will tell you when the things that are happening that are not yet -- so you can intervene. they tell you all about how to go about doing it. i really learned the most in my career from those relationships. >> from high school dropout and single mother to the youngest police chief in washington, d.c., history. what cathy lanier on c-span's q&a. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979
of the second administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for b
on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our country's reckless policies. this is robbing our cities and states of critical investments and infrastructure like bridges, ports and levees. every dollar we pay in interest is a dollar that is not going to investment in america's priorities. instead, interest payments are a significant tax on all americans, a debt tax, that washington doesn't want to talk about. increasing america's debt weakens domestically and internationally. leadership means that the buck stops here. instead, washington is shifting the burden on bad choices today onto the backs of our children and grandchildren. america has a debt problem. and a failure of leadership. americans deserve better. all of those words were taken from then senator obama's statement before he voted against raising the debt ceiling in 2006. truer words cannot have been spoken today. the debt burden the president was concerned about a few years ago is still a very real threat today. congress should pass a responsible budget so we have a road map to get to our serious
on outgoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our governments reckless fiscal policies over the past five years, our federal debt has increased by three and a half trillion dollars, to $8.6 trillion. would love to have those numbers today. since then we now have a $16.4 trillion debt, nearly doubled in six years. in fact, since this president has become president, 2009, he has added more than, more than four times, more than 4 trillion, more debt in four years, excuse me, than the previous president did in eight. so to the forget, quick question. was the president right? is this a failure of leadership? is there a better direction? >> i certainly think he was right that we ought and to continue to run the store based on borrowing. there's a lot of ways you can pay your debts. and they don't all conclude -- >> but since he made that speech it's gotten worse. he's done nothing to change the trajectory. it's gotten worse. so was the president right? is it a leadership that are? >> i would agree with that, it is. >> congressman, i'm would say that he was right to say what h
, congress and the administration should be implementing policies that encourage job creation, rein in government regulations, replace our convoluted tax code with one that is fair, simple and certain, open foreign markets to american manufactured goods and agricultural products and develop a comprehensive energy policy. we are not immune from the laws of economics that face every nation. the congressional budget office estimates that government spending on health care entitlements, soegts security and -- social security and interest on the national debt will consume 100% of the total revenues generated by the federal government by the year 2025. that means the money that the government spends on national defense, transportation, veterans health care and other government programs will have to be borrowed, driving us even further into debt. c.b.o. issued a report last june which warned that unless we work to reduce our debt, we face the increased probability of a sudden fiscal crisis that would cause investors to lose confidence in the government's ability to manage its budget and th
of america now weighing a change to a policy against allowing openly gay members. if you thought the decade or so since 9/11 was bad, wait till you see the next ten years. we got a very grim warning from the british foreign secretary william haig. he's here in "the situation room."ve exactly how they want. with scottrade's online banking, i get one view of my bank and brokerage accounts with one login... to easily move my money when i need to. plus, when i call my local scottrade office, i can talk to someone who knows how i trade. because i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. awarded five-stars from smartmoney magazine. did you just turn your ringer off so no one would interrupt and.us?one. oh no, i... just used my geico app to get a tow truck. it's gonna be 30 minutes. oh, so that means that we won't be stuck up here, for hours, with nothing to do. oh i get it, you wanna pass the time, huh. (holds up phone) fruit ninja!!! emergency roadside assistance. just a click away with the geico mobile app. >>> after a wave of protests, a huge chan
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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